Kaddish for The Tree of Life (2:24) Mumia Abu-Jamal

10/28/18
KADDISH FOR THE TREE OF LIFE
[col. writ. 10/28/18 (c)’18 Mumia Abu-Jamal]
 
Kaddish, in Jewish ritual, is sung at the graveside of the departed.
 
It is a chant, a song, a psalm of life’s loss, which now, in the quiet city of Pittsburgh, must be sung almost a dozen times, after a white racist, armed with a semi-automatic rifle, entered a synagogue (a Jewish temple) during a naming ceremony for children, and left death in his wake.
 
This massacre occurred just hours and days after another man left over a dozen bombs to be mailed to several former presidents, and actor, and several prominent Black politicians.
 
What connects these two events besides time?
Both men left messages online revealing hatred for immigrants, whom both called “invaders”.
 
Where have we heard that word recently?
 
At Trump rallies the US President sends his audiences into wild frenzies of applause when he damns people of Latin America as ‘invaders’ of North America.
 
Yes, it must be said that Trump spoke out against anti-Semitism (perhaps it is correct to say he read someone else’s writing) recently. But I ask you, if you can, to listen again. You will hear silence - no applause, no yells or peals of agreement.
 
Just silence —-‘silence of the lambs’.
 
President Trump began his campaign by damning Mexicans, and flashed from there to immigrants.
And after his fateful embrace of white nationalists of Charlottesville, Virginia, who can be surprised at the flash-fire of hatred of Jews?
 
Trump has lit the flames of rhetoric with his tongue at rallies across the nation.
 
How can we be surprised when those who hear him send bombs, or open fire?
 
—(c)’18 maj